You searched for "CPAP"

65 results found

Does CPAP help diabetes?

This meta-analysis and review of the literature examines the long-held belief that CPAP treatment improves glucose levels in patients with OSA. As usual in these cases, thousands of articles were initially flagged up in the search with only six RCTs...

Nasal deformity following CPAP injury

Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is commonly used as a non-invasive alternative to endotracheal intubation and tracheotomy to provide respiratory support to very low birth weight (VLBW) (<1500 g) neonates. Nasal injury is a well recognised complication and figures...

RCT: tongue retaining devices vs CPAP for OSA

This study compared the effect of a tongue retaining device versus the use of CPAP in 27 patients within a crossover RCT design. Tongue retaining devices (also known as tongue stabilising devices), are similar in appearance to a plastic tongue-sized...

Dizziness in OSA patients– is there a link and can CPAP treat it?

This is a small study which proposes an interesting hypothesis - that in patients with both dizziness and OSA, treatment of their sleep disorder can provide resolution of their dizziness symptoms, which were otherwise refractory to standard treatment, particularly in...

An alternative device for obstructive sleep apnoea

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the first-line treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), primarily due to the vast amount of short-term evidence in the medical literature it has accrued. The enduring obstacle to CPAP from becoming a treatment option...

Effectiveness of oral pressure therapy in obstructive sleep apnoea: a systematic analysis

Oral pressure therapy (OPT) is a relatively new form of therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Paradoxically it seems to work even though it creates a vacuum in the oral cavity as opposed to the gold standard of continuous positive...

How useful is AHI?

There is a growing unease in the sleep medicine world about the usefulness of the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI). Most of our objective evidence about obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is in some way related to the AHI, and the respiratory physicians...

Describing the most useful OSA assessment?

This article sets out to comprehensibly describe drug induced sleep endoscopy and its role in determining the level of obstruction in patients with OSA. The advantages described include the fact that other techniques, including Muller’s manoeuvre, have significant variation in...

Modern surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea indicate suppression of inflammatory cytokines

This study comprises 57 patients, 29 of which were treated by anterior palatoplasty procedure, expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty and submucosal minimal invasive lingual excision techniques and 27 by CPAP therapy. Parameters to determine success were AHI, VAS score, ESS score, mean...

Identifying CN IX and X using endotracheal tube electrodes

This clinical study describes the possible usefulness of endotracheal tube electrodes in monitoring vocal cord function during cerebellopontine angle surgery in 20 patients. Lower cranial nerves, especially IX and X are at risk of injury during skull base surgery although...

A medical student’s perspective on the future of obstructive sleep apnoea management

Obstructive sleep apnoea remains an immensely challenging condition to treat. Many treatments have been used over the years, but no single management strategy has proven significantly better than the others. We hear about some technological innovations in the field of...

Surgical management of sleep disordered breathing

Snoring and sleep-disordered breathing are often described as multi-level problems, and different surgical procedures are required to treat the various sites of airway narrowing and/or collapse. Jonathan Hobson gives us an eloquent run-through the various options available to the ENT...