Laryngology: past, present and future

Two laryngological authorities trace the history of laryngology, from ancient Rome to the modern day. The structure of the vocal folds was a matter of conjecture until the renaissance when anatomists such as Andreas Vesalius and Julius Casserius demonstrated the...

An update on laryngeal reinnervation

Laryngeal paralysis remains very difficult to treat, but reinnervation offers many attractions. Laryngeal paralysis presents a unique and varied problem that requires a patient centred approach and a range of treatment options depending on laryngeal and patient factors. There is...

Demystifying laryngology in the era of examination and collaboration

In the field of laryngology, perhaps more than in any other area of ENT, there has been a philosophical shift (as well as a technological one) in the approach of clinicians caring for patients. Albert Merati explains. Progress in laryngology...

Laryngeal papillomatosis

Laryngeal papillomatosis remains one of the most frustrating conditions seen by laryngologists. Sam Majumdar gives us an overview of the current science and clinical practice. Human papilloma virus is a small (> 8kb) double stranded DNA virus with approximately 200...

Vocal cord paralysis: an update

The management of unilateral vocal cord paralysis has changed in the last few years: this has largely come about as a result of improvements in technology, meaning that medialisations are quicker and easier to perform than previously. This article will...

Laryngotracheal stenosis

Airway stenosis has been an enormous challenge to laryngologists since the dawn of the sub-specialty. Careful evaluation is essential, as this will determine the best treatment. We hear more from one of the UK’s leading airway centres. Until the advent...

What’s new in laryngology: the next 10 years!

At a time of unprecedented technological advances, Taran Tatla and Jonathan Fishman gaze into the laryngological crystal ball… Introduction The recent explosion in science, technology and innovation takes us into a new era, with the opportunity and capability to transform...

Greener pastures? Reflections from UK ENT surgeons now practising abroad

Ever considered practising ENT abroad? Here are some experiences of previously UK-based ENT surgeons who took the plunge and are now plying their trade in distant lands. Andrew McCombe ENT ConsultantDate of migration: December 2015Place of work: Mediclinic City Hospital,...

Dr KJ Lee: From Penang to Presidency of the AAO-HNS… and beyond!

Anyone who’s ever stopped to wonder about the personalities behind well-known names in ENT will enjoy Keyu Liu’s article on Dr KJ Lee, rich with stories of his travels, inspirations, and personal philosophies, alongside his momentous achievements. If you’ve experienced...

New international collaboration: Young Otolaryngologists of IFOS – ‘YO-IFOS’

The Young Otolaryngologists of IFOS, founded in Paris in 2017, has an ambition to fulfil four key missions at an international level: education, research, networking and congress-related activities. Kate Stephenson tells us more about this exciting initiative. During the recent...

Migration and training: a British-Nigerian surgeon’s perspective

Less than 4% of doctors on the UK’s medical register describe their ethnicity as African or part African, yet there are myriad driving forces behind the migration of medical trainees from Africa to the UK and other developed countries. Ekpemi...

“Oh Manchester is Wonderful” ...and other chants you might hear from the football 
stands or at BACO

Chris Potter is a lad of the North West, and we see him here letting his bleach blond hair grow out to show us his Northern roots. When I was a lad, Manchester was a troubled city in apparent terminal...