Event Details
Date: 11 October 2018 - 12 October 2018

Location name: Sheffield, UK

Location address: Mercure Sheffield St. Paul's Hotel & Spa, 119 Norfolk Street, Sheffield S1 2JE, UK

Contact: Hayley Skidmore


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Report by Miss Kimberley Lau (ENT ST6 Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield)

The IAD2018 Conference hosted in Sheffield was dedicated to bone conduction and middle ear implants. There were plenty of opportunities to gain up-to-date knowledge. Conference Chairman, Professor Jaydip Ray, welcomed audiologists, hearing scientists, otologists, nurses, speech and language therapists and engineers. Over 150 attended from UK, France, North and South America, Netherlands and Spain. The rich educational programme included keynote lectures, free papers, a short paper competition, and round table discussions with ample opportunity for socialising and networking.

In his keynote lecture entitledHearing Care is Brain Care,’ Professor Gerry O’Donoghue highlighted the global burden of hearing loss. He demonstrated the increasing evidence of the long-term effects of hearing loss, including loss of quality of life and cognitive decline. The panel discussions were lively and allowed free exchanging of ideas stimulating debate and audience participation. Mr James Ramsden from Oxford shared the UK experience with the fully implantable Carina device, which has adequate gain to cover hearing losses up to 90dB. Dr Jérôme Nevoux from France added that these could also be successfully implanted in patients with mastoid cavities.

There have been plenty of technological advances in implantable auditory solutions recently, and this meeting brought together a wide range of professionals to critically evaluate these different solutions and hopefull,y with this new knowledge, be able to better help their patients with hearing loss.

The short paper prize was won by Rachel Powell from Manchester for her work on 'Decision making in bone conduction hearing implant candidates.'

  

Mr Junaid Hanif presenting the short paper award to Rachel Powell.