You searched for "reconstruction"

890 results found

Multiple free flaps for head and neck cancer

Most patients with advanced head and neck cancers now undergo microvascular free flap reconstruction. This is mainly as flaps facilitate complete tumour and margin removal by providing reliable wound coverage and better restoration of form and function. However despite this,...

Reconstructive Plastic Surgery of the Head and Neck: Current Techniques and Flap Atlas

Head and neck reconstruction continues to provide a challenge to surgeons, driving innovative approaches in free-flap surgery and a need to embrace developing technologies. This excellent text, written primarily by authors from the renowned MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas,...

Reconstructing post-resective auricular defects

The auricle is split into six specific anatomic subunits that vary in skin thickness, contour, structural integrity and the availability of healthy surrounding tissues. It is important to reconstruct an aesthetically pleasing auricle as slight deformities may be prominent. The...

The double-half bilobed flap or traditional bilobed flap: which is better?

Reconstruction of the nasal tip following ablative surgery can be taxing. The nasal tip is a very visible area with largely immovable skin and reconstruction needs an appreciation of the various subunits to achieve best results. The traditional superiorly based...

Two for one forearm flaps

There are many and varied free flaps available for reconstructions. Here is a variant on the workhorse radial free forearm flap. The modification involves a longer, narrower flap that can be rotated back on itself to increase the flap width...

Postauricular advancement flap for partial helix defect repair

Ear defects can be the result of trauma, burns or ablative surgery. The three dimensional structure of the pinna presents a difficult reconstructive challenge as successful ear reconstruction requires both similar tissue cover and a supporting framework. Partial ear reconstruction...

Canal wall up mastoid defects - can they be usefully reconstructed with hydroxyapatite cranioplastic cement?

Standard canal wall up (CWU) mastoid surgery leaves a mastoid defect of varying size, commonly covered by soft tissue. Rarely, this bony defect can cause discomfort, cosmetic issues or other problems. To mitigate these, the defect can be filled either...

Facial Surgery: Plastic and Reconstructive

Following Professor Cheney’s first popular publication in 1995 on flaps and reconstruction and subsequent second edition, he has now co-edited with Tessa Hadlock a comprehensive two-volume production. They have put together an extensive range of plastic and reconstructive surgery in...

Microtia and Atresia – Combined Approach by Plastic and Otologic Surgery

In this textbook Kaga and Asato, both leading experts in otology and plastic surgery respectively, present over 10 years of their experience in joint reconstructive surgery for microtia and auricular atresia, combining autologous auricular reconstruction with external auricular canaloplasty and...

A new flap for the perinasal region

Perinasal defects are most commonly caused by tumour extirpation or trauma. There are a number of methods to reconstruct the defect, and the method chosen depends on the size of the defect and other patient considerations. When the defect is...

Mastoid obliteration for canal wall down surgery

Surgery for acquired cholesteatoma is varied amongst surgeons with some only performing combined approach tympanoplasty. The change in lifestyle for patients with canal wall down surgery is significant and hence this group in Japan looked at 118 adult patients with...