The Association of Otolaryngologists in Training: by trainees for trainees

The Association of Otolaryngologists in Training (AOT) is an independent organisation, run by trainees for trainees in the UK for over 25 years. Its aims are to represent all ENT trainees in the UK; to improve and promote standards of...

Across the pond: a tale of two fellowships

Where in the world is Halifax? Many outside of Canada have never heard of the Maritime Canadian town of Halifax. Before leaving to start a year-long fellowship there, we both had to answer many questions from family and friends about...

Evidence-based hospital management of epistaxis

Epistaxis is the most common presentation to acute ENT services in the UK. However, there are currently no nationally accepted guidelines for its management. The British Rhinological Society, ENT UK and INTEGRATE (The National ENT Trainee Research Network) are working...

The Graham Fraser Foundation

Graham Fraser (1936-94) was a pioneering otolaryngologist, in whose memory the Graham Fraser Foundation was set up, and an eponymous annual lecture and a travelling fellowship in otology were established. It’s an honour to profile the Foundation in this extended...

Communication Disorders: a combined discipline of audiology and speech and language pathology – the Israeli perspective

Liat Kishon-Rabin provides an excellent summary of audiology training in Israel, encapsulating the development of audiology services in the country. Readers will be intrigued by the systematic approach taken to its development, and its pairing with speech and language pathology....

Focus on ENT trainees with additional qualifications

In this edition of Trainee Matters, we focus on ENT trainees with additional qualifications. Eight accomplished trainees tell Emma Stapleton how their achievements have benefitted them both professionally and personally. Their professional achievements have included a National Training Number in...

INTEGRATE: Uniting collaborative research in ENT

Exposure to clinical research as a trainee is often sporadic and unstructured, despite it featuring in both the GMC’s Good Medical Practice and the ISCP’s syllabus for all surgical specialities, including otolaryngology [1,2]. The majority of trainees undertake small-scale research...

Perspectives on audiology training and education in Canada and New Zealand

In this edition of Trainee Matters we look at audiology training in two different locations from around the world, Canada and New Zealand. Marshall Chasin gives us an overview of the education system in Canada, while Amy Arrowsmith explains the...

In conversation with Miss Romola Dunsmore “ENT training in my day”

Emma Stapleton is an ST8 in Otolaryngology at Doncaster Royal Infirmary, UK. For her first Trainee Matters article, Emma and her colleague, Ruth Capper (Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Doncaster Royal Infirmary), spoke to 92-year-old ENT surgeon Romola...

A comparison of two different audiology roles in Denmark and the United Kingdom

The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that there are over 360 million people with a disabling hearing loss in the world. Disabling hearing loss is considered to be a loss of greater than 40 decibels (dB) in the better hearing...

RSM ‘Otology Dragon’s Den’

Figure 1. Prof Gerry O’Donoghue with the presenters at the Dragon’s Den event. From left to right:Back row: Prof Gerry O’Donoghue, Mr Vik Veer, Mr Alex Yao, Miss Natalie Hopka, Prof Tony Narula, Mr Matt Clark, Miss Emma Stapleton, Mr...

Audiology Training – Time to change our Spots? A student’s perspective of the Scientist Training Programme

In the “Just-so Stories”, the accomplished wordsmith Rudyard Kipling details how the leopard got his spots. Which concludes that the leopard will never change his appearance again as he is quite content just the way he is. The former degree...