The Association of Otolaryngologists in Training: by trainees for trainees

The Association of Otolaryngologists in Training (AOT) is an independent organisation, run by trainees for trainees in the UK for over 25 years. Its aims are to represent all ENT trainees in the UK; to improve and promote standards of...

Across the pond: a tale of two fellowships

Where in the world is Halifax? Many outside of Canada have never heard of the Maritime Canadian town of Halifax. Before leaving to start a year-long fellowship there, we both had to answer many questions from family and friends about...

Evidence-based hospital management of epistaxis

Epistaxis is the most common presentation to acute ENT services in the UK. However, there are currently no nationally accepted guidelines for its management. The British Rhinological Society, ENT UK and INTEGRATE (The National ENT Trainee Research Network) are working...

The Graham Fraser Foundation

Graham Fraser (1936-94) was a pioneering otolaryngologist, in whose memory the Graham Fraser Foundation was set up, and an eponymous annual lecture and a travelling fellowship in otology were established. It’s an honour to profile the Foundation in this extended...

Communication Disorders: a combined discipline of audiology and speech and language pathology – the Israeli perspective

Liat Kishon-Rabin provides an excellent summary of audiology training in Israel, encapsulating the development of audiology services in the country. Readers will be intrigued by the systematic approach taken to its development, and its pairing with speech and language pathology....

Focus on ENT trainees with additional qualifications

In this edition of Trainee Matters, we focus on ENT trainees with additional qualifications. Eight accomplished trainees tell Emma Stapleton how their achievements have benefitted them both professionally and personally. Their professional achievements have included a National Training Number in...

INTEGRATE: Uniting collaborative research in ENT

Exposure to clinical research as a trainee is often sporadic and unstructured, despite it featuring in both the GMC’s Good Medical Practice and the ISCP’s syllabus for all surgical specialities, including otolaryngology [1,2]. The majority of trainees undertake small-scale research...