Shooting for Gold: ENT surgery and the Commonwealth Games

What are the secrets to success in your career, sports and life in general? Sharp-shooter Parag Patel hits the bullseye again. I write this article following a wave of summer sporting brilliance, from the record Great Britain 67 medal haul...

The National Bone Conducting Hearing Implant Registry

Are you an otologist with an interest in implant surgery? Is your unit on the registry? If not, you’d better have a good excuse after reading this… What is the National BCHI Registry? The National Bone Conducting Hearing Implant (BCHI)...

ENT and evidence-based medicine: How do they benefit each other?

How do we assess evidence, and how should ENT surgeons use EBM? Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is the practice of medicine based upon high quality scientific research. There are several formal definitions of EBM, the most widely quoted being that of...

Human factors, theatre ethnographics and Girls Aloud

The issue of ambient music in the operating theatre is frequently controversial and has been known to cause ‘Bluetooth wars’, as different team members vie for control of the speakers. Our own Chris Potter gives his personal slant on this...

Medical and surgical management of performing vocalists

Dr Steven Zeitels is widely recognised as the foremost laryngologist of his generation. He has been at the forefront of innovation for 25 years, and has treated innumerable high-profile singers, most recently Sam Smith and Adele. Here, he gives us...

Tone deafness and perfect pitch

If you think you are tone deaf, do not despair. Singing tuition should help but it is probably too late to hope to develop perfect pitch. Consultant otolaryngologist and keen musician, Chris Aldren, discusses the complex and fascinating subject of...

Why is a Raven like a writing desk? Some reflections on countertenors and castrati

The countertenor voice has seen a resurgence in popularity in the last 50 years. Nicholas Clapton is one of the foremost performers and teachers of his generation, and he tells us here about the link between countertenors and the (fortunately...

Vocal cord dysfunction and dysfunctional breathing: an evolving clinical paradigm

Patients frequently present to the ENT department with breathing difficulties. The entity of ‘vocal cord dysfunction’ (also known as paradoxical vocal cord movement, inducible laryngeal obstruction, and many other names) is increasingly well recognised. Ravi Thevasagayam gives us an overview....

Singing after laryngectomy: Shout at Cancer

Thomas Moors is an ENT junior doctor with a background in music and singing. Combining these interests, he has set up a charity to help patients who have had a laryngectomy. He has achieved considerable public attention, and he tells...

'If music be the food of love, play on'

Christopher Aldren Consultant Otolaryngologist, Wexham Park Hospital, UK. Chris playing at Cambridge garden party 2003. Chris with wife and sons Tom and Alex in family quartet. Chris leading the Doctors Orchestra at the Cadogan Hall in London. Christopher Aldren, Consultant...

Chronic rhinosinusitis management: back to the future?

Immunology is a dim and distant medical school memory to many ENT surgeons, but the increasingly complex immunology of chronic rhinosinusitis is fascinating (honestly!). Medical management options in CRS no longer just involves saline and steroids, and we need to...

Staphylococcus aureus as a cause of refractory chronic rhinosinusitis

Staphylococcus aureus has long been linked to chronic rhinosinusitis, particularly recalcitrant cases. In this article, Alkis Psaltis describes how newer techniques have shown higher rates of S. aureus infection than were previously thought, and explains how the bacteria are able...