Can we prevent chronic rhinosinusitis?

The old adage ‘prevention is better than cure’ is considered by Professor Hopkins in respect to chronic rhinosinusitis, a condition affecting around 10% of the adult population and associated with huge impact on quality of life and economic cost. A...

The future of rhinology

Over the last few decades, rhinology has been one of the most dynamic and progressive areas of ENT. Professor Fokkens is perfectly placed to offer insight into the future possibilities that could transform our patients’ care, many of which are...

How trainees can make major contributions to practice

At a time when many of our trainees feel poorly supported and disheartened, the formation of a National ENT Trainee Research Network (Integrate) has been a major advance, enabling them to develop and execute research projects directly relevant to clinical...

The astronomer’s nose: Tycho Brahe’s controversial prosthesis

Tycho Brahe (1546-1601) is a familiar and colourful figure in the history of science. The immense quantity of data he collected during his lifetime would enable the work of Johannes Kepler and has gained him admission to the astronomical pantheon....

The role, aims and organisation of the 2017 IFOS World Congress

IFOS is a truly international organisation – indeed, its rules state that the Executive Committee must have representation from every continent. IFOS President, Chong Sun Kim, tells us more. Dear friends and colleagues, I am very pleased to welcome all...

What’s happened since the European position paper on nose and sinus tumours?

The management of malignant sinonasal tumours has gone through radical changes in recent years. Prof Valerie Lund gives us an update based on her upcoming talk at IFOS. In 2010 when we published the European position paper on ‘endoscopic management...

Rhinology: what does the future hold?

David Kennedy surveys the past, the present and the future of rhinology practice and research. An evolution of understanding in rhinology The dramatic growth of clinical and translational research within the field of rhinology in recent years is illustrated by...

Chronic rhinosinusitis management: back to the future?

Immunology is a dim and distant medical school memory to many ENT surgeons, but the increasingly complex immunology of chronic rhinosinusitis is fascinating (honestly!). Medical management options in CRS no longer just involves saline and steroids, and we need to...

Staphylococcus aureus as a cause of refractory chronic rhinosinusitis

Staphylococcus aureus has long been linked to chronic rhinosinusitis, particularly recalcitrant cases. In this article, Alkis Psaltis describes how newer techniques have shown higher rates of S. aureus infection than were previously thought, and explains how the bacteria are able...

The role of macrolide antibiotics in chronic rhinosinusitis

The use of long-term antibiotics in the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis is a contentious issue, not only because of the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance but also because of the potential cardiac risks, including sudden death. In this article, Anders...

Timing of surgery in chronic rhinosinusitis: does it matter?

While many patients with chronic rhinosinusitis respond to medical treatment, some do not. The next step for these patients is surgery, but how soon should this be offered? Sooner rather than later seems to be the answer, as Claire Hopkins...

The common frontal sinusotomy (Lothrop) and chronic rhinosinusitis

As our understanding of the pathophysiology of CRS evolves, so do our treatment strategies. It is accepted that in many cases, the main role of surgery is to allow better penetration of topical therapies to the sinus cavities. What, then,...

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