You searched for "dementia"

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Do you know what aphasia is?

In 2001 a survey was conducted in a number of towns across the world, including Exeter in the UK, to identify the level of awareness and knowledge of aphasia in the community. Aphasia is difficulty in producing or understanding language...

Do certain chronic medications increase dysphagia in older people?

Oropharyngeal dysphagia is known to affect a high number of older people in the community, in care homes and in acute geriatric admissions to hospital. The authors of this study have recognised that many older people take drugs for chronic...

Assessment and management of dysphagia in the elderly

This article covers dysphagia in older patients, which is an important topic due to an ageing population, and a relatively common symptom that we see in clinic. Dysphagia could be due to presbyphagia secondary to changes in head and neck...

Cochlear implantation in adults has a positive impact on overall cognitive function as early as six months postop

The link between improving hearing and thus improving cognition is an important emerging area of research in hearing rehabilitation, due to the independent association between hearing loss and dementia. This study uses visually assessed neurocognitive tests of working memory, information...

BSA (British Society of Audiology) Annual Conference

Report by: Helen Whiston MSc Research Audiologist, University of Manchester. Wolverhampton Wanderers stadium served as the backdrop for the British Society of Audiology’s (BSA) annual conference, welcoming approximately 120 delegates. The conference was opened by Dr Gareth Smith together with...

BSHAA calls on Public Health England to raise the profile of hearing

Society presses for national campaign as NICE publishes new guidance “Hearing must no longer be consigned to the margins of care” BSHAA, the professional body for independent audiologists in the UK, has urged Public Health England to raise the profile...

Neurological idiopathic disease: a shared journey for NASA and medicine

Whilst Southampton can’t really be described as an extreme environment, experiments carried out in the city have certainly been taken out of this world. Robert Marchbanks discusses one of the associations between Southampton, The International Space Station and tympanic membrane...

‘What was I talking about?’ Memory and discourse in language impairment

This article discusses the function of the three theoretical components of working memory and their influence on discourse (the phonological assembly, the visuo-spatial sketchpad and the episodic buffer). The authors emphasise that the buffer is the key conceptual component responsible...

Does talking better make you feel better?

Interaction-focused therapy for people with language impairment (aphasia) following a stroke or brain injury is routinely used by speech and language therapists in clinical practice. These types of interventions are based on research into the organisation of interactions and interactional...

What about the older adults?

The authors of this paper propose that significant changes in the delivery of services, including speech and language therapy management of swallowing difficulties, may be required. Among the most common causes of dysphagia in older adults are stroke, progressive neurological...

Let the maths do the talking for word-finding difficulties

Anomia (word-finding difficulties) can arise when a person has a stroke, dementia or other neurological disorder affecting the left (typically) hemisphere of the brain. There are lots of theories underlying the process of word retrieval, many of which have not...

Quick and valid: a new measure of aphasia

Aphasia can be caused by a stroke, brain injury or dementia. It is defined as a language disorder that impacts the domains of speaking, understanding, reading and writing. Given the impact on quality of life and conversation, there is a...