Continuing professional development

In this article Siobhán Brennan explores continuing professional development (CPD) in all its glory! She outlines why it’s important to continue learning throughout our careers, highlights some of the challenges facing those trying to undertake CPD and discusses the variety...

Looking at musculoskeletal disorders in audiology

Musculoskeletal disorders are one of the leading cause of sickness absence from work, work disability and loss of productivity across all European Union member states. Isla Beausire is a working audiologist with a personal and professional interest in this subject...

‘Want an upgrade?’ Moral distress in audiology

Ethical practice in audiology has become a hot topic in recent years, particularly in the independent sector where sales can be linked to commissions. Andrea Simpson has explored this issue in her research and shares her insight into the drivers...

The potential benefits of having supervision in clinical practice

Marie Wardle is the Programme Director of the Interpersonal Therapy department in the West Midlands, UK and part of her role is to deliver supervision training courses for therapists in the region. Therapists, whether supporting patients with psychological or physical...

Hearing, tinnitus and hyperacusis in the arts

Hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis are discussed by David Baguley from the unique perspective of their depictions in literature, music, film and paintings. This article provides unusual and invaluable reflective opportunities for the patient-centred clinician! Audiologists and otologists understand hearing...

Tinnitus and music

Marc Fagelson discusses how not just hearing loss, but tinnitus and hyperacusis and impairments to an individual’s ability to process music can adversely affect one’s quality of life, as well as their overall interactions from a societal and personal perspective....

Music is noise

Marshall Chasin recaps what we know acoustically about music and noise, and discusses the potentially damaging levels of music, how temporary threshold shift (TTS) is not necessarily temporary and gives us some considerations for protective devices for musicians. Most of...

Teaching the art of cooking to a hearing impaired chef

Today catering is a hugely popular career choice for many people and there’s a new cookery competition or programme on our TV screens every week. But beyond the media glamour, the kitchen is a challenging and noisy working environment, in...

Hidden hearing loss in humans

Awareness of cochlear synaptopathy (‘hidden hearing loss’) is growing. Chris Plack gives us an introduction to the condition, defining it and reviewing recent research in humans and animals with respect to noise exposure. The main cause of hearing loss is...

A binaural detection task that reveals deficits in listeners having ‘slight’ or ‘hidden’ hearing loss

The association of degraded binaural processing in adults with clinically defined ‘slight’ or ‘hidden’ high frequency hearing loss is of great interest to clinicians if it can be measured. Leslie R Bernstein and Constantine Trahiotis share their findings in measurements...

Developing outcome measures for research

There are challenges in developing outcomes measures; Professor Hall presents five top pointers for making rapid progress in developing outcome measures for research purposes. Anyone who has worked clinically with hearing loss will appreciate that every patient’s experience is personal....

Hearing aid outcomes in older adults: what and when to measure

What matters to older adults when purchasing a hearing aid? Larry Humes explores the domains that should be measured for this key group. This article identifies key domains of hearing aid outcome in older adults. Increasingly, third-party payers and private-pay...