Swallowing it whole: the physical and psychological consequences of dysphagia

Living with dysphagia in the real world can be extremely challenging, both practically and psychologically. Long-term changes in taste due to chemo-radiation treatment for head and neck cancer, fatigue due to Parkinson’s disease, and physically impaired structures due to stroke...

The right to choose: stories from the rare dementias

People with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) experience an insidious onset and gradual decline in language on a background of lesser or no cognitive impairment, hence a language-led dementia. There are three different PPA variants that correspond with three different clinical...

Functional considerations in reconstruction after laryngectomy

With a plethora of different reconstructive options and techniques available after laryngectomy, it can be difficult to clearly see which give the lowest complication rates and best functional outcomes. This article aims to summarise the current evidence in swallowing and...

Pretend placements: simulation is as good as the real thing

Clinical placements are now, more than ever during the COVID-19 pandemic, a huge time and personnel commitment. Recently, allied health students have had huge changes to their placements, often undertaking them entirely remotely. This article describes a novel method of...

The right to choose: the how-to of practicable supports

Providing all practicable supports to enable a person to participate in decision-making is one of the five key principles of the English and Welsh Mental Capacity Act 2005. This article (set in the Canadian legal framework, which has many similarities...

How long is too long? Waiting times for speech and language therapy

Waiting lists are a reality of clinical practice, and many health and social care professionals become used to having to cope with this. The authors of this paper addressed this issue by examining written submissions to the 2014 Senate Inquiry...

Evidence-based clinical education

All healthcare professionals participate in education of students in both their own and other disciplines. It is part of our role and we are often used to squeezing it in and around our clinical responsibilities. In fact, the events during...

Speculating on saliva during endoscopy

It has been noted that the presence of saliva in the pharynx and larynx during flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) can be an indicator of increased risk of aspiration and consequent pneumonia, as well as weight loss and malnutrition....

Future practice: tele-rehabilitation in speech and language therapy

It is known that our population is ageing, resulting in an increase in the number of people living with progressive neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s disease. Health services endeavour to deliver specialist and personalised care to all these people, often...

People with language-led dementia in India

Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a language led dementia characterised by slowly worsening speech and language. It is associated with atrophy of the dominant temporal-parietal lobe regions and is commonly caused by frontotemporal or Alzheimer’s pathologies. There are three PPA...

Speedy speedy: people with MND chew faster but speak slower

Motor Neurone Disease (MND) is a progressive neurological condition that affects motor neurons in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord, affecting the control of skeletal muscles for speech, chewing and swallowing. There are two variants of MND, with symptoms typically...

Enhanced recovery following surgery for head and neck cancer – the current evidence

Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programmes are now well established in many surgical specialities as a means of reducing postoperative complications and length of stay in hospital. Whilst many head and neck teams have interventions used to aid postoperative recovery,...