Telepractice in COVID-19 and beyond

COVID-19 has suddenly forced health professionals to switch from face-to-face to remote video conferencing to deliver many or most of their services. This article considers the current state of this service delivery model (also called telepractice) for speech and language...

Till death do us part: the role of the speech and language therapists in palliative care

Increasingly, speech and language therapists are being involved in end-of-life and palliative care. This study reports on a three-phase project to explore this in the context of the Australian healthcare system. In phase one, the authors described a scoping review...

Quick and valid: a new measure of aphasia

Aphasia can be caused by a stroke, brain injury or dementia. It is defined as a language disorder that impacts the domains of speaking, understanding, reading and writing. Given the impact on quality of life and conversation, there is a...

Talking it through: voice therapy

The authors begin this article by highlighting two issues in voice therapy: 1. the high rate of relapse and 2. poor attendance at appointments. They attribute this to there not being carryover (or generalisation) work embedded into most voice therapy...

Students on camp

This article describes a three-day weekend camp for individuals with chronic aphasia and their care partners, designed to address personally relevant activities and conversations that help redevelop self-worth, confidence, and identity. The aim is to support carryover into individuals’ local...

The telemedicine genie is out of the bottle

Delivering healthcare interventions remotely is not a new concept. The authors of this article provide a brief history dating back to the 1930s, when the International Radio Medical Centre was established to transmit medical advice to global seafarers. In the...

Show me the video: modelling for behaviour change

It is estimated that 2% of people in the United States have autism. The DSM 5th edition defines the autism spectrum diagnosis criteria as when an individual has social communication difficulties, as well as restrictive and repetitive behaviours. One intervention...

Can we get some satisfaction (in aphasia therapy)?

Patient satisfaction is associated with improved health outcomes, yet using surveys to collate information on satisfaction is limited by the types of questions asked. Satisfaction remains a broad concept but asking respondents more open questions allows service users to define...

What is voice?

Voice is an area of clinical practice in speech and language therapy where there remains much debate, not only around the aetiology and classifications of voice disorders, but around the treatment of them. In general, it is accepted that ‘voice...

Bringing aged care back

Worldwide, our older population is increasing, and thus a need for the provision of care to older people is also increasing. Aged care may be informal, provided by unpaid carers; or formal, provided or subsidised by government or other organisations....

Swallowing it whole: the physical and psychological consequences of dysphagia

Living with dysphagia in the real world can be extremely challenging, both practically and psychologically. Long-term changes in taste due to chemo-radiation treatment for head and neck cancer, fatigue due to Parkinson’s disease, and physically impaired structures due to stroke...

The right to choose: stories from the rare dementias

People with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) experience an insidious onset and gradual decline in language on a background of lesser or no cognitive impairment, hence a language-led dementia. There are three different PPA variants that correspond with three different clinical...