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Secrets of the listening brain: what measuring the brain can tell us about hearing aid use and more

In a typical audiology clinic, on any given day, a person is waiting to see an audiologist to get a hearing aid (HA). It might have taken over 10 years to get to this point of considering a hearing aid(s)...

Audiology in this issue...The Weird World of Science

Gareth Smith, Consultant Clinical Scientist (Audiology), Southend University Hospital, UK. E: Gareth.Smith@southend.nhs.uk Twitter: @garethlsmith In this edition, I’ve taken rather an editor’s privilege in exploring outside of our mainstays in audiology and widened the field to consider acoustics more widely...

What’s new in protecting hearing?

Preventing an avoidable hearing loss before it begins would be the public health dream. In this article Kathleen Campbell takes us through one option that is showing the potential to fulfil that ambition. Kathleen explains the development of a preventative...

Subjective tinnitus – adding mutebutton™ to your tinnitus toolbox

Neurophysiologic tinnitus or subjective tinnitus is typically a sound or a number of sounds that originate from the auditory nervous system. They are unwanted sounds that do not exist in the external environment. They can be heard in one or...

Optimising hearing aid processing for music appreciation

Hearing aid manufacturers’ main focus has, up until recently, been improvement of speech intelligibility. Today’s hearing aid users have much broader demands however and often cite improved music perception as a key outcome or goal. Drs Tish Ramirez and Rebecca...

Anaesthesia under fire

Kate Prior is an anaesthetist who has, quite literally, been there, done that. In this article she manages to use words on a page to bring to life some of the conditions and challenges she faced as a member of...

Is flexible nasendoscopy really aerosol generating?

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the safety of office-based laryngoscopy has been a source of considerable concern, speculation and debate. Flexible nasendoscopy is a key diagnostic tool in the assessment of the ENT patient, however most healthcare providers consider this to...

A future for unilateral deafness

Every year, we see several patients struggling with irreversible unilateral hearing loss that is non-responsive to sound amplification. This article emphasises that clinicians should not underestimate the functional and psychological impairment single-sided deafness can have on an individual, even though...

Effect of stimulation levels on speech recognition and auditory threshold performance

When programming a Cochlear® device, two measurements are normally assessed. T levels relate to the quietest sound the CI user can hear i.e. thresholds, and C levels are comfortable levels which are tolerable for the CI user. If these levels...

Tinnitus apps (revisited)

If you’ve experienced an uptick in the number of your patients complaining of tinnitus lately, you are not alone. In fact, there is some evidence that the social and emotional strain of the ongoing pandemic many exacerbate tinnitus for existing...

The role of prediction and gain in tinnitus

Dr Will Sedley is a Clinical Academic Neurologist who has done groundbreaking work in the field of tinnitus mechanisms. Here, he introduces and explains the concepts of prediction and of gain as they relate to troublesome tinnitus. This article focuses...

World Hearing Day 2022

On World Hearing Day 2022, WHO will focus on the importance of safe listening as a means of maintaining good hearing across the life course. In 2021, WHO launched the World report on hearing that highlighted the increasing number of people living with and at risk of hearing loss,