IFOS activities

International collaboration is more important than ever, and we hear from Prof Milan Profant about a collaboration that grew out of the very successful IFOS meeting in Paris in 2017. IFOS has developed a new philosophy regarding how to organise...

The Airway Intervention Registry: Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (AIR: RRP) data collection

Laryngeal papillomatosis remains a frustratingly difficult condition to treat. Adam Donne and Steven Powell tells us about a collaborative project aiming to enhance patient care. The first UK Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis registry opened in April 2018 through the AIR (Airway...

Matthew Clark: full-time otologist, spare-time sculptor

Drilling a temporal bone may seem like torture to some trainee surgeons. To others it is but a stepping stone to something altogether grander... I took Art A-level a year early so as not to interfere with the ‘important subjects’,...

True Cut – a dramatic biopsy from the world of surgery

True Cut is a stage play that asks: “What happens when things go wrong in healthcare?” It brings the hidden world of the operating theatre onto the theatre stage. ENT surgeon, David Alderson, talks about how the play came about....

Alfred Alexander: a life in ENT, but mainly music

Your own voice clinic may be filled with teachers, elderly clergy and badly trained pub singers, but it wasn’t always like this... When I was first invited to write an article about opera and ENT for this edition of ENT...

The Medical Art Society

Historian, sculptor and general polymath Neil Weir neatly demonstrates the strong links between our speciality and the creative arts, along with his colleague from the Medical Art Society, Jeanette Cayley. At a summer meeting of the British Medical Association in...

Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise

Our irrepressible Features Editor, Chris Potter, explores the limits of ignorance. I’m not sure about you, but I seem to exist in a sea of incompetence and ignorance, constantly surrounded by amateurish chumps and feckless underachievers. Now, a lesser man...

Laryngology: past, present and future

Two laryngological authorities trace the history of laryngology, from ancient Rome to the modern day. The structure of the vocal folds was a matter of conjecture until the renaissance when anatomists such as Andreas Vesalius and Julius Casserius demonstrated the...

An update on laryngeal reinnervation

Laryngeal paralysis remains very difficult to treat, but reinnervation offers many attractions. Laryngeal paralysis presents a unique and varied problem that requires a patient centred approach and a range of treatment options depending on laryngeal and patient factors. There is...

Demystifying laryngology in the era of examination and collaboration

In the field of laryngology, perhaps more than in any other area of ENT, there has been a philosophical shift (as well as a technological one) in the approach of clinicians caring for patients. Albert Merati explains. Progress in laryngology...

Laryngeal papillomatosis

Laryngeal papillomatosis remains one of the most frustrating conditions seen by laryngologists. Sam Majumdar gives us an overview of the current science and clinical practice. Human papilloma virus is a small (> 8kb) double stranded DNA virus with approximately 200...

Vocal cord paralysis: an update

The management of unilateral vocal cord paralysis has changed in the last few years: this has largely come about as a result of improvements in technology, meaning that medialisations are quicker and easier to perform than previously. This article will...