Vestibular migraine or BPPV?

There are close similarities between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and vestibular migraine (VM) as both can be presented by positional nystagmus. Though BPPV remains the commonest cause of pure positional vertigo, VM can mimic this condition. This study is...

A predictor of successful treatment of posterior canal BPPV

Reversal of nystagmus on returning to the upright sitting position from the Hallpike position is a common observation. However, its relevance as a predictor of a successful canal repositioning manoeuvre (CRM) is not known, hence this study. The retrospective study...

Static positional nystagmus

This study aimed to clarify the interpretation of positional nystagmus (PN) by looking at the current criteria for significance of PN, comparison of PN in symptomatic patients with normative data, prevalence of PN among participants with balance problems and assessing...

Comparison between objective and subjective BPPV

BPPV presentation in ENT clinics is variable. The objective of this study was to examine differences in demographic and clinical features, as well as treatment outcomes, between classic objective BPPV (O-BPPV) and subjective BPPV (S-BPPV). Unlike classic BPPV (with nystagmus),...

International classification of BPPV

In the past few years, the Bárány Society has made great strides in defining and classifying vestibular disorders along the lines of the international classification of diseases. This article addresses the diagnostic criteria for BPPV, the commonest cause of vertigo....

Horizontal nystagmus: vestibular neuritis or lateral canal BPPV?

A horizontal nystagmus due to lateral canal (LSC) BPPV that is present in the upright position, that changes direction with head turn in the horizontal plane has been termed ‘pseudo-spontaneous nystagmus’ (PSN) because it mimics that of vestibular neuritis. The...