You searched for "Hyperacusis"

88 results found

Treatments for hyperacusis

Centred on a patient’s experience, this article provides a brief summary of the condition of hyperacusis as an introduction to the treatments that are currently available. It is enhanced by the fact that the individual mentioned is a musician by...

Physiological mechanisms of hyperacusis: an update

Hyperacusis is a heterogeneous and complex clinical entity, and proposals about physiological mechanisms should reflect these issues. Ben Auerbach helps us navigate through present knowledge in this area, and proposes future directions for research. Hyperacusis is a debilitating hearing disorder...

Unravelling the mystery of hyperacusis with pain

When a person says that sound causes them pain, how can we understand this, and determine what processes are involved? Bryan Pollard navigates us through what is presently known. Pain has long been underrepresented – and often, completely overlooked –...

Audiology in this issue...Hyperacusis (Jan/Feb19)

Audiologists, otologists, and auditory neuroscientists are accustomed to dealing with problems of hearing loss but, until recently, little attention has been given to the experience of hearing sound too intensely. This experience is variously given the names hyperacusis, and reduced or decreased sound tolerance, and the affected individual finds everyday sound intensely and excruciatingly loud, rendering workplaces, shops, and social spaces intolerable.

CBT for tinnitus and hyperacusis

Finding an efficient treatment for tinnitus attracts the interest of researchers worldwide. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is one of the widely researched methods used in tinnitus management. The aim of this study was to investigate what proportion of patients complete...

Hearing, tinnitus and hyperacusis in the arts

Hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis are discussed by David Baguley from the unique perspective of their depictions in literature, music, film and paintings. This article provides unusual and invaluable reflective opportunities for the patient-centred clinician! Audiologists and otologists understand hearing...

Untangling the emotional and physiological aspects of hyperacusis

In hyperacusis, the physiological and the emotional aspects can become deeply entwined. Dr Sarah Theodoroff draws us into her perspectives on this important aspect of the condition. Background Sounds and Emotions The basic act of hearing sounds triggers an emotional...

Which self-reported tinnitus and hyperacusis questionnaires are useful?

Tinnitus and hyperacusis may have very negative psychological side-effects. Due to their subjective nature it is important to have appropriate tools to assess them. In addition to the routine questionnaires such as THI, HQ, ISI, HADS or VAS, the authors...

Hyperacusis and Disorders of Sound Intolerance: Clinical and Research Perspectives

Hyperacusis and other forms of decreased sound tolerance (DST) is an area that many ENT/audiological colleagues would deem as ‘woolly’. This is due to a lack of understanding behind the mechanism of the symptoms, a lack of evidence-based assessment tools...

Collaborating with patients on research priorities in hyperacusis: the James Lind Alliance project

An innovative and inclusive approach to the identification and prioritisation of research questions is to place the views of patients at the heart of the process, and in partnership with clinicians. The application of this to hyperacusis is described by...

What do animal models tell us about tinnitus and hyperacusis?

Do animals have tinnitus? The obvious question to ask is: do animals have tinnitus? It is known that tinnitus is a conscious percept and as such affected by attention and not audible during sleep. For it to be demonstrated that...