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1915 results found

Cambodian Otology Fellowship report

Further to a Humanitarian News article published in the November/December 2014 issue of ENT and Audiology News (see article here), this is a report of Charlie Huins’ six-month experience as the first ENT Fellow at the Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC),...

Stapedotomy in osteogenesis imperfecta

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare connective tissue disease caused by a defect in collagen structure. Hearing loss is a characteristic feature of OI. It typically presents with conductive hearing loss initially, followed by a superimposed sensorineural component later in...

Inter-aural hearing preservation in cochlear implantation

Hearing preservation during cochlear implantation is becoming increasingly important, although results can be unpredictable. NICE are in the process of updating their guidance in the UK and it is possible that those with better hearing than the current candidates will...

Tinnitus and leisure noise

Tinnitus attracts large interest among researchers all over the world due to its negative psychological side-effects. Researchers from the National Acoustic Laboratory (NAL) tested life-time noise exposure and its influence on the tinnitus experience in 1435 young Australians from various...

First ever WHO World Report on Hearing launched on 3 March

On 3 March, thousands of people in over 100 countries joined together to celebrate World Hearing Day and to work together towards patient-centred ear and hearing care for all. This day also marked the historic launch of the first ever...

Steroid use in acute acoustic trauma

Acute acoustic trauma (AAT) injuries include noise-induced damage to inner and middle ear presenting as hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo. Classic presentation is sensorineural hearing loss with an intact tympanic membrane. The authors carried out a case-control study in military...

A cognitive therapy programme for hearing impairment: reducing avoidance and mental distress

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), a psychotherapeutic treatment method, is most commonly used to treat anxiety and depression. Newly published results from a controlled, clinical study demonstrate that an adapted CBT programme is useful for several common challenges in aural rehabilitation;...

Preoperative unaided maximum monosyllabic word recognition score as a predictor of CI outcomes

This retrospective study supports early intervention and hearing rehabilitation with hearing amplification for adults. The authors included 103 patients (128 ears), who had undergone cochlear implantation over a seven-year period, in this study. All patients had been assessed for their...

Objective testing for Eustachian tube dysfunction

Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD) is typically diagnosed based on subjective symptoms and examination leading to wide variation in its diagnosis and management. The search for an objective test has looked at ways of measuring the passage of air through the...

How the earwig got its name

What are earwigs, and how are they connected with the ear? Amr Abdelhamid explains the etymology, myths and beliefs behind the pesky creature with the otological name. Earwigs are harmless insects of the order Dermaptera that are amongst the most...

Surgery for Cochlear and Other Auditory Implants

Make no mistake, this is a big book. Admittedly it’s not as big as Scott-Brown, which Liam Flood couldn’t carry from his office to his car without resting several times, but it’s still a whopping beast. Measuring 32cm in height...

A ‘rye’ tail – the fatal illness of Lord Boringdon, a Regency tragedy

The anonymous privately-printed book, Some Account of Lord Boringdon’s Accident, describes in deferential terms a case of aspiration of a foreign body and its sequelae. Today aspirated foreign bodies are serious but curable injuries; before the invention of the bronchoscope...