Laryngology: past, present and future

Two laryngological authorities trace the history of laryngology, from ancient Rome to the modern day. The structure of the vocal folds was a matter of conjecture until the renaissance when anatomists such as Andreas Vesalius and Julius Casserius demonstrated the...

An update on laryngeal reinnervation

Laryngeal paralysis remains very difficult to treat, but reinnervation offers many attractions. Laryngeal paralysis presents a unique and varied problem that requires a patient centred approach and a range of treatment options depending on laryngeal and patient factors. There is...

Demystifying laryngology in the era of examination and collaboration

In the field of laryngology, perhaps more than in any other area of ENT, there has been a philosophical shift (as well as a technological one) in the approach of clinicians caring for patients. Albert Merati explains. Progress in laryngology...

Laryngeal papillomatosis

Laryngeal papillomatosis remains one of the most frustrating conditions seen by laryngologists. Sam Majumdar gives us an overview of the current science and clinical practice. Human papilloma virus is a small (> 8kb) double stranded DNA virus with approximately 200...

Vocal cord paralysis: an update

The management of unilateral vocal cord paralysis has changed in the last few years: this has largely come about as a result of improvements in technology, meaning that medialisations are quicker and easier to perform than previously. This article will...

Laryngotracheal stenosis

Airway stenosis has been an enormous challenge to laryngologists since the dawn of the sub-specialty. Careful evaluation is essential, as this will determine the best treatment. We hear more from one of the UK’s leading airway centres. Until the advent...

What’s new in laryngology: the next 10 years!

At a time of unprecedented technological advances, Taran Tatla and Jonathan Fishman gaze into the laryngological crystal ball… Introduction The recent explosion in science, technology and innovation takes us into a new era, with the opportunity and capability to transform...

BACO International 2018: Key Speakers

Prof Aldo C Stamm, MD, MSc, PhD Anatomy of the paranasal sinuses and skull base, and breaking the paradigms in severe spontaneous epistaxis It is a true honour to participate as an invited faculty member at the upcoming BACO International...

Intraoperative nerve monitoring: 2017

Having written the definitive text on laryngeal nerves, Gregory Randolph and Dipti Kamani describe the benefits of intraoperative neural monitoring and, importantly, how to proceed if the nerve is pathologically involved or there is loss of signal. Over the years,...

Minimally invasive techniques for benign salivary gland obstruction

Salivary gland obstruction is a common condition – it is recognised by a complaint of intermittent meal-time swelling of the affected salivary gland and can be accompanied by recurrent infections. Imaging can identify the nature and location of an obstruction...

The role, aims and organisation of the 2017 IFOS World Congress

IFOS is a truly international organisation – indeed, its rules state that the Executive Committee must have representation from every continent. IFOS President, Chong Sun Kim, tells us more. Dear friends and colleagues, I am very pleased to welcome all...

Manuel Patricio Rodriguez Garcia (1805-1906): The ‘inventor of the laryngoscope’ and world-renowned singing teacher

Paris was the birthplace of the laryngoscope, invented by Manuel Garcia. As we are in Paris for IFOS 2017, Neil Weir tells us about this fascinating man, who travelled the world and was a renowned singer and laryngologist. Manuel Patricio...